Ep #29 Grounded Leaders: The Importance of Centeredness in Leadership

by | May 16, 2024 | Core Centering, Mindset, Organizational Culture, SCA Podcast

The Somatic Coaching Academy Podcast

Watch the episode

Listen to the podcast here

Transcript

Ani
hi, and welcome to the Somatic Coaching Academy podcast. Hey there, Brian.

Brian
Hello, Ani.

Ani
We have been talking about centering and core centering. We’re going to talk about it again today. I just want to make sure if you’re listening that you’ve heard that we are so excited. The Somatic Coaching Academy is going to be at the world renowned Kripalu Center for Yoga and Healthcare in the beginning of June 2024. We’re going to be doing our core centering training there, live and in person. And we are so excited to be at Kripalu. If you’ve been to Kripalu before, you know how special it is. And if you haven’t been to Kripalu before, it’s one of those places where it’s this world-renowned retreat center where people go to do somatic practices and other… That’s reflective. I was going to say contemplate. How do you say contemplate? Contemplative. Contemplative. Contemplative. Contemplative. That I was having trouble with the… Anyway, of that. It’s a place where people go to reflect and to contemplate and to learn and to grow. The people there are amazing, and the grounds there are beautiful. The things that you learn at Kripalu are just so wonderful. It’s the thing where you go and you take it away with you and it lingers and it’s lovely.

Ani
Their food is also really great. We love the cafeteria and the locally sourced food and things like that at Kripalu, especially their ricecakes. We have a joke that we like to make Tai chi, Yin-Yang symbol ricecakes with a peanut butter and jelly at Kripalu. So we hope that you are considering joining us at Kripalu this June for the core centering training. So today we get to talk more about centeredness. Don’t we, Brian?

Brian
Yeah. Centered leadership today we’re talking about. And let’s just jump right into it. The idea for those of you who work in organizations or you are a leader in an organization. What’s an organization? It could be a school. It could It could be a business, it could be a corporation, it could be your family, it could be whatever. Anytime we’re working with other people, we’re in some type of organization. The idea of centered leadership is as a leader in an organization, listen, we’ve all worked in, well, maybe not all of us, but a lot of us have worked in organizations where the leader was not centered. Just think about the level of disruption that that has on the whole organization. When the person you’re looking to for feedback, for guidance, for focus, for support is not centered, and they are having trouble managing themselves and their own responsibilities and their own lives, it’s very difficult to have a productive work environment that way.

Ani
It really is. I had a boss when I was working in health care who you never knew who was going to come through the door in the morning. The rest of the team got there before her. And we also never knew what time she was going to show up. Sometimes she would show up at 8:30. Sometimes she wouldn’t show up until 11:00. And so we would get there, we would say hi, we’d start our work, and then we would start to get hypervigilant. Our whole systems were bracing for when she was going to come and what… I’ll just say, mood she was going to be, what energy she was going to… What problem she was dragging in. We have a colleague who did a paper on evil bosses. I thought it was so much fun. It was very cathartic to talk about this time in my life. It was really challenging for the whole team.

Brian
For the whole team. So whatever is going on with the leader, whether they’re chronically evil or whether they’re just having a really hard time. When they’re not When it’s not centered, it ripples down through everybody in the organization who has at least direct contact with that person and with the jobs that they’re able to do. So this idea of centered leadership isn’t new by any means, but there’s some really interesting research that an organization called Bain & Company did. And so Bain & Company did some research. They interviewed 2,000 employees, 2,000 employees. They did interviews and feedback forms and those kinds of things. So it was pretty detailed methodology that they went through. And they identified 33 statistically significant traits of a inspiring leader. So they’re specifically asking their employees about the traits of an inspiring leader.

Ani
They were trying to get some data on what it was that if we could nail it, this is what makes an inspiring leader all the time. We can just figure out that trait or those two things or five things or whatever it is and just reproduce that, right?

Brian
Yeah, exactly. They interviewed 2,000 people, and 33 traits rose to the surface from 2,000 interviews. So you can imagine 2000 interviews, you’re going to get a lot of different traits, but these 33 statistically stood out from the other traits. And these 33 traits were then categorized into four different quadrants. If you want to think about it like that. And so the first quadrant was, and these quadrants aren’t necessarily in a hierarchy. They’re not better than the others, but these are basically the four quadrants that these 33 traits fall into to make an inspiring leader. Okay, so the first quadrant was connecting with others, connecting with others. And these traits were things like humility and expressiveness. Kind of think about those things. That’s the idea of connecting with others. That’s the box number box number one. And box number two was leading the team. So you can think about these as the capacity to give direction, have vision for where we’re going. I think that quadrant is what we typically think about in terms of a leader in that area. So that’s that box. So far, we have connecting with others and leading the team.

Brian
The next box was called Setting the Tone. Setting the Tone. And this box was things like openness and shared ambition. There’s this word I learned a long time ago when I was working at my favorite hospital that I worked at way back when. It was a word called the milieu. And when I first heard it, I was like, What the heck does that mean?

Ani
It’s fun to say. It’s almost as fun as contemplative.

Brian
And I had to go and look it up. And what’s milieu mean? And the It’s the environment. It’s the broth. It’s the broth of the soup. It makes the soup. That’s like the milieu. So this idea of setting the tone struck me as the milieu. The idea of openness, shared ambition, that thing. And then the final quadrant was developing inner resources. And so these are things like stress tolerance, flexibility, resilience. Those things fit into that box. So all 33 traits, all of them are going to fit into one of those four boxes.

Ani
We actually have a picture of the thing that you’re talking about on our website. If you go to the website and go to programs, and you look up the course centering program or the somatic practice essentials program, you click on that, then you scroll down on the page and you’ll be able to see exactly what Brian’s talking about.

Brian
Yeah, there’s an image right there. And what was interesting is right in the center of all of the traits. There’s one trait to rule them all. Lord of the Rings, right? So there’s one trait to rule them. There’s one trait that locked them all together, that, not surprisingly, was right in the middle of all these traits, which was the trait of centeredness.

Ani
And they found that different leaders who would be considered inspiring had all of these different attributes, but the one attribute that they all shared was centeredness.

Brian
Was centeredness. And so this attribute in follow-up research that Bain and Company did, this is actually the attribute that was the most desired by emerging leaders to develop was the idea of centeredness.

Ani
Oh, really? Did they call it by that? Did they say that in the article?

Brian
I didn’t look deep enough into that study to understand how they actually did the methodology for it. That was just a reporting of the study.

Ani
Bain & Company has a few subsequent studies based off of this information. So one of the things that when I read the study for the first time, other than be like, Prime, you got to write this, was what the heck did they mean when they said centeredness? Correct. Do you have it written down?

Brian
I do. Yeah. So for them, the definition of centeredness, as far as the Bain and Company article is, is engaging all parts of the mind to become fully present.

Ani
I love the definition, it tickles me. I love it so much. I love one of the reasons why I love it is because they say mind, and I’m back here being like, mind and all of the things that mind means, not just brain.

Brian
Engaging all parts of the mind, right?

Ani
Engaging all parts of the mind, the body, the spirit, the mental, emotional, the gut, the intuition, the heart, all aspects of mind, which, by the way, I think is really true intelligence. I don’t think it’s… I wouldn’t say it’s somebody’s IQ. It’s really somebody’s ability to tap into all aspects of intelligence that we have access to.

Brian
It’s complete human intelligence.

Ani
That’s a great tagline. It reminds me of something. Oh, right.

Brian
I heard that before.

Ani
Ours. Yeah. Yeah, all complete human intelligence. And then if you just read the first part of that, though, you’re like, wow, tapping into all as engaging, all as best of mind or whatever. But to what? Why? To what end?

Brian
To become fully present.

Ani
To become fully present. When we’re fully present as leaders, anything is possible. Anything is possible.

Brian
And what does that look like to be fully present? Great. How would we know when someone’s fully present?

Ani
I talk about this thing with my clients all the time, and I’ve personally found that the flavor of it can be a little bit different from person to person. I would say that, of course, because I’m very into individualization. So the way that I’ve noticed it comes up with people to be fully present is to… A few key things – To be able to listen, to be able to be curious, to be embodied and not just coming from a head space, to not be in a place of reaction, but rather from a place of response, but to also be in one’s purpose, to really truly be in one’s purpose. When I ask clients about this idea of being present, also comes up because the things that they say that are a little bit different really to who they are. And I would assert as a leader that to be fully present is about being in and on our own purpose and allowing the people around us to be fully in theirs as well. Because when we do that, it requires us to listen and be open and curious and not reactive but responsive and all of those things to really create unprecedented amounts of innovation, unprecedented amounts of motivation and energy and all of the things that we aspire to when we lead teams.

Brian
Yeah, I love all those definitions. And if I may build on those a little bit, I think there’s also some qualities about this humility of certainty. So as a leader, it’s really important that we have certainty in where we’re moving, but a sense of humility with it. So it’s not an egoic certainty, but there’s there’s a humble certainty to be able to guide that direction.

Ani
I just read a really interesting article, I remember, I didn’t tell you about, that was talking about humility and how it’s so important for leadership. And they found that, here back to the body and the importance of the body, that people who have bowing as some part of their daily life or practice, if they’re bowing, for example, because they’re doing yoga practice or they bow to people, that bowing actually is a somatic practice that lends itself to a person who is more humble. Interesting. Yeah. And their leadership. I thought that was really cool.

Brian
That is pretty fascinating. And so thanks for sharing that. I’m going to want to get that study from you later.

Ani
You can bow to me anytime you want. Oh, okay. Thanks.

Brian
Oh, boy.

Ani
I will bow back to you, Brian.

Brian
Open that door. So we have this idea of certainty and also confidence, too, but in the same aspect. The confidence is there’s a humbleness to it. As a leader, it’s important to have certainty and also confidence that the team, we can do this together. We can move this forward. We can create this initiative. We can create this product or this plan or get this done or create the environment or whatever it is. This idea of certainty and confidence is also a really important part of centeredness. I like to just think that even builds a little bit further, and you mentioned this a little bit, was a sense of coherence also. As leaders, to have a sense of coherence with their team. There’s been lots of research to show that teams, that when they work very closely together, like surgical teams that have worked together a lot, and they start to be able to read each other’s minds, so to speak, in terms of scalpel. They don’t even have to ask for the scalpel. They don’t have to… They know exactly what to do. That when their skin galvanic responses match up, the electrical activity on their skin becomes the same.

Brian
Their brain waves synchronize. So they’re coming into coherence. So teams that are highly functional become literally their physiology and their brain wave activity becomes the same.

Ani
Do you think that happens to us?

Brian
Probably. Get out of my head, honey. Get out of my brain waves.

Ani
Exactly. So another interesting thing about leadership and coherence is that actually, in terms of coherence, the leader energetically will be the person who has the most consistent energy about themselves. So if you’ve ever been on a team where there’s somebody with a title of team leader or manager, CEO or whatever, and there’s this person who is chronically annoying or chronically complaining or something, guess who is probably leading, actually leading, not from a title standpoint, but actually leading the energy of the group. So coherence is …It’s a jedi scale. It’s so powerful as a leader to be able to harness one’s own centeredness so that even In the midst of other folks who have powerful energy, we can still energetically lead the group into coherence.

Brian
Yes. And I would like to promote the idea that coherence is rooted in the body. It’s rooted in our physiology.

Ani
Why would you say that, Brian?

Brian
Because it’s how we feel that makes it real. It’s what we feel that makes it real. And we might say that we’re confident with our mouths, but if our legs are like jelly, then that is essentially what’s going to be propagated or what’s the word I’m looking for? What’s the vibrational frequency? It’s what’s going to be shown to , projected to other people? We might say one thing, but our subconscious minds are reading subconscious minds. And what’s really going to be projected is what’s going on in your body.

Ani
Well, it’s that idea that communication is actually… I don’t have the exact. Is it 4%, 7%? Maybe it’s 7% of what we say. Communication is only 7% what we say. It’s 93% all the other things.

Brian
Yeah, it’s a lot nonverbal.

Ani
Right. And nonverbal isn’t just body language. Nonverbal is also vibrational.

Brian
Yes, exactly. What someone actually feels when they’re around you or when you’re around them.

Ani
Yeah, especially when other folks are highly sensitive or empathetic or whatever. The crazy thing about that is that people could be picking up on the vibration or they’re feeling something, but then we as humans make meaning about what we think that is. And so all of a sudden, there’s like an elephant in the room, and it’s the frequency, but everybody’s making different meaning off of it. That’s nuts. And it’s so true. But the centered leader can actually bring a team into coherence. And then all of a sudden, other people feel better, do better, etc. They don’t even know why. And they don’t care, by the way, because they’re happier, they’re more joyful, they’re more readily able to handle challenges that come up. More productive. More productive, more motivated, more relaxed.

Brian
All those things. And this is why it’s so important we think about the idea of a centered leader. So how do we get there? So we know the traits now, and this idea of centeredness is so important. And all these other traits also. So we approach it from the idea of the core centering for leadership.

Ani
So I just want to say this for a second. You get there by practicing it. Exactly. You get to centeredness by practicing it. And sometimes I have this conversation with clients all the time, I’ll say, How often do you practice centeredness? And they go, What do you mean? We practice what we want to get good at. If you want to learn to play the piano, you have to practice, because otherwise, you’ll sit at the piano and you won’t be able to play. And we don’t say to ourselves with something like the piano, Why can’t I play the piano? Why isn’t it making beautiful music? We know, well, it’s not making beautiful music because I haven’t practiced. It’s not making beautiful music because I don’t know how to read the music, and I don’t know how to make it work on my fingers, and I don’t know how to play the piano. But we don’t think about that when it comes to stuff like centeredness, but it’s the same thing. Same thing. You have to practice. And in order to practice, you need to know what practice is to practice.

Brian
So let’s talk about the practice is the practice. I love that. It’s a great segue. Core centering. When we talk about practicing core centering, this is why we’re so excited that people are bringing core centering into organizations and doing it with leadership teams, with teams in general, with emerging leaders, because this is how you get to these traits and how you develop centerness. It’s really, really critical to think about this. And all of these traits, we go back to the Bain article, 33 traits. All these traits, if you look at them, they all span across the idea of having a healthy and optimally regulated nervous system. So none of these traits are possible if your nervous system is dysregulated. Again, why I would suggest that this is rooted in the body. Because if we have a dysregulated nervous system, it doesn’t mean that we’re thinking about being open or we’re thinking about being dysregulated. That’s what our nervous system will focus on, trying to get back in regulation, not our higher cognitive functions. Yeah.

Ani
In order to aspire to and work towards having a regulated nervous system, you need to know what it looks like and feels like to be dysregulated and regulated so you can identify that. It’s one of the reasons why we talk about things like window of tolerance, actually, in all of our programs, because you’re not going to be able to elicit change in your life whether you’re doing it from a body somatic practices place or from a mind somatic intelligence place, or from a how do I live into my most purposeful best self more spiritual nature place, if you don’t have a regulated nervous system. Absolutely.

Brian
So what I’d like to do, Annie, is actually talk about this in each one of these quadrants. So the first quadrant we talked about was connecting to others or connecting with others. And one of them is empathy. Empathy is one of the traits that is within that category of connecting with others. We think about what’s required for empathy? When we think about this through the core Centering program, one of the things we do a lot of is working on vagal toning and helping people to stimulate and strengthen their ventral vagal complex.

Ani
I’m helping you strengthen your vagal complex right now.

Brian
You are? By being empathetic?

Ani
I’m smiling. You’re smiling? I’m touching you nicely.

Brian
Yeah. That’s because you practice, the centering practices a lot, right? Because like we were talking about, you have that practice, that practice capability. We have to have that ventral vagal complex resilience, the capacity to activate that part of your vagus nerve system and that part of your brain and how it connects with all the other parts of your body. If you can’t do that, then empathy is going to be, if not difficult, impossible for a person. That’s the thing we spend a lot of time on with the core centering practices is strengthening the ventral vagal complex pathways. Great. What else? All right, what else? Okay. The other block was leading the team. That was the other quadrant. One of the traits within that is the idea of focus, to be able to focus so that you can lead the team.

Ani
That makes sense. I think so often in leadership, it’s not like you’re leading a group of people on a bright sunny day down a path that’s fully paved. It’s like finding your way through the jungle or when it’s cloudy and you can’t see or you’re bushwacking. If you don’t live in the woods like us, bushwhacking is this thing where you’re like, there is no path. Boy, I don’t like bushwhacking at all, Brian. You get stuff on your legs, and It bothers me. But that’s what it feels like when you’re leading a team very often. It’s not like that sunny walking down the street thing. It’s like bushwacking.

Brian
Yeah, Bushwacking. And you still have to have focus. It’s like, okay, so we’re moving in this direction. We’re going to stay focused. We’re going to stay focused to get over the trees and around the vines and stay away from the poison ivy. All that stuff requires focus and planning. So the whole idea of focus really engages the medial prefrontal cortex. This is the human part of the brain. We’re mammals, and the cortex is the part of the brain that has developed in humans more so than in animals, than in mammals. It’s the part of our brain that allows us to reason and plan, project forward, or change our behavior now to get a different result in the future. That’s all this idea of focus and planning is a part of the prefrontal cortex.

Ani
That’s the same part that’s offline when we’re stressed. That’s the same part that goes offline when we’re bushwhacking, we don’t like it.

Brian
We’re pissed about bushwhacking. We don’t like getting stuff on us. We got the mud. Our prefrontal cortex is offline because we feel threatened, we feel unsafe in the woods, all those kinds of things.

Ani
And oftentimes, we don’t know that we’re offline either, which is a key feature of being truly offline is you think that you’re online and you think that you are focused. But in reality, your system is focused on safety and threat, and it’s not actually conscious focus. It’s really full subconscious unconscious focus.

Brian
It’s not creative focus. It’s more exactly what you said.

Ani
You cannot have a creative focus if your nervous system isn’t regulated. Correct. If your physiology isn’t regulated. I just want to be very clear. It’s not just a mental state.

Brian
Exactly. You won’t be capable of even performing that mental state, like you just said, if your physiology is dysregulated.

Ani
It’s such a dangerous- People try to think, Oh, I’m going to just think harder.

Brian
I’m going to just knuckle down my thinking. Even if you can do that, You’re still not nearly as effective, not even close.

Ani
Not even close, because as you try to solve problems and meet challenges, you’re actually meeting those challenges from the same vibrational frequency that the challenges were created. So you’re going to keep creating eventually the same challenges. It really is such a dangerous place to allow it oneself to be in as a leader because we think that we can muscle through or we think that we’ve got it, but because we’re mentally focused or whatever. But if your physiology is dysregulated. If your physiology is not in homeostasis, you will not be able to think of the creative and use your brain and all your creative faculties to think of the creative, different vibrational, next level vibrational frequency idea so you don’t keep creating the same problems. I think this is one of the reasons why we see over and over and over again in organizations, they invest billions of dollars in training and coaching and all these kinds of things to do new initiatives, and then the initiatives don’t move the needle. Why doesn’t the needle move? It’s because we’re trying to create from a place where we’re not really paying attention to our physiology first.

Ani
If we paid attention to our physiology, we’d be able to move the needle, not just once, over and over and over again. You did tell me I was going to get a little bit on a soapbox.

Brian
I told you you you were going to love this one, honey. I said, Honey is going to love this podcast. I’m just going to keep it rolling.

Ani
It really bothers me when people continue to invest, and the needle doesn’t move. It’s like the itchy thorns in the bushwhacking. It really bothers me because there’s a better way. It doesn’t have to be like that. We can actually create change. And not only can we create change but we can create change in a way that feels good and more nice to people. We think that change needs to be created by dragging people around or dragging people in or making people do things or incentivizing or dangling carrots or whatever. It doesn’t have to be like that. Okay, where are we?

Brian
All right, here we go. Okay. So what we’re talking about here is a roadmap. We’re talking about a roadmap to become an inspiring leader. That’s really what we’re talking about. The Bain article told us what it’s the traits of an inspiring leader. Did all the research around that. Centeredness is right at the middle of all of the traits. If we can learn to cultivate centredness, we can become inspiring leaders. We can teach other people to become inspiring leaders. We can go in organizations and train emerging leaders to become inspiring. Imagine what world that would be.

Ani
And we can help people to lead themselves. I mean, that’s what leaders really want. They want to be able to help people to lead themselves themselves so that the organization just thrives and moves every single day with self-leadership. I mean, it takes a lot of pressure off the managers, too, to think about that. One of the biggest problems we hear from managers is that the managers spend all day dealing with other people’s problems. Imagine the organizations we could have if everybody was able to self lead.

Brian
Yes. And in order to do that, you have to know know how to activate these four quadrants. So we already talked about in order to connect with others, you really have to be able to activate the ventral vagal complex, know how to do that. In order to lead the team with focus, you have to be able to know how to activate your prefrontal cortex and keep it activated, keep it online, and that depends on what’s happening in your body to a large degree. Okay, what about setting the tone? So one of the milieu. So one of the traits inside of that was responsibility. The idea of setting up a milieu of responsibility. I thought this was a really fascinating one. I was really interested in chatting about this a little bit because the idea of responsibility takes in a lot of parts of our system. But one of the ones that popped out for me immediately was the idea that when someone feels responsible for something, that can feel a little itchy. That’s what I’m thinking as I’m listening to you. How? I don’t want to be responsible. Or if a project goes sideways, who’s responsible?

Brian
What do we need to do to create a strong milieu of healthy responsibility? I think from a physiological perspective, we really have to dial into the limbic system here. Okay. I have to go down the limbic system because the limbic system has a lot to do with these body responses around defensiveness.

Ani
I love where you’re going with this.

Brian
It’s where I was going to go to. There’s a defensiveness. Instead of a taking up of that responsibility, there’s a defensiveness around it. You point to the other person like, Oh, it was their job sort of thing. That’s a limbic response that happens subcortically deep in the body to protect ourselves, to pull away from the potential punishment or challenge or danger associated with who is responsible for this. Now, if we had better control of that, if we have better conditioning, toning of it, we never really have conscious control all the time our limbic responses. However, like you’re saying with practice, if we practice in engaging and strengthening healthy limbic responses, healthy limbic and motor responses, then we’re less likely to be defensive and reactive around ideas like responsibility.

Ani
This is so exciting because there’s plenty of research out there talking about how the number one thing that an organization needs to do, and this is more from a cultural standpoint, Brian, is to have psychological safety as a cultural feature, as a value in the culture. And as we talk about psychological safety and what that means, it’s the idea that I can make a mistake, and I’m not going to get slapped for it. I can make a mistake, and we’re going to talk about it. There’s a major problem, though, with saying that we have a culture of psychological safety when actually what we need to really be looking at is people’s perception of threat. And as a leader, we don’t have the control to be able to fix or go in there and grab your scalpel and change somebody’s perception. But we can be a great coach and help somebody. And I would assert the only way really to do this is through a sensation-based approach, to be a person who can actually relax their nervous system to accept a culture of psychological safety. And that’s what you’re talking about, about how the limbic system perceives threat.

Ani
So we could have a culture of psychological safety, but still have people in the team. I would say that with 90% of people around having traumatized nervous systems, that you are going to have people who, even though you say you have a culture of psychological safety, even though you’re not actually going to get slapped if there’s a mistake made or whatever, that there’s still going to be the perception of people because of their limbic systems that maybe there’s a threat there. Absolutely.

Brian
I love it. All right. The last category, developing inner resources and stress tolerance. That’s pretty commonly talked about, may not understood. Common talked about. We all know that if we had better stress tolerance, then we’d probably perform better in our roles as leaders. Let’s face it, like Ani said, life isn’t always a nice, happy, paved road that we’re riding our bikes down. We’re bushwhacking, there’s thorns, things happen. There’s life, too. Life happens.

Ani
I mean, all of us are balancing life and work and personal stuff and professional stuff. Sometimes stuff is just really hard. People are dying and people need to be taken care of and things break. I mean, life can be a lot.

Brian
Life can be a lot. So this idea of stress tolerance is really important. So how do we expand our window of tolerance for more stress tolerance? Well, we go back to these optic limbic responses again, like we had just talked about previously. A lot of the way that we experience or perceive threat around us will activate stress by itself. So if we had less perception of threat around us, we’d be less likely to have stress A lot of it goes back to that idea of confidence, coherence, certainty, all those things wrap around that, and that builds back into these wiring within the limbic system, motor reflexes, and also a part of the brain called the default mode network. So the default mode network is the part of our brain that is the hum in the background of our self-awareness. Are we paying attention to ourselves? And not self-centeredness, like egoic self-centeredness. In order to have positive relationships at work and at home, we really have to be able to multi-purpose our attention both to what’s going on outside of us, but also what’s going on inside of us. If we’re ever in balanced with that, if we’re paying only attention to what’s going inside of us, then we become a non effective to communicating outside of us.

Brian
And if we’re only ever paying attention to what’s going outside of us, then we are letting go of our own needs to appease what’s going on outside of us. We have to have that balance. The default mode network is a part of our brain that really helps us to do that, that when there’s this background hum of awareness inside of us, even if what’s going on outside of us is completely on fire, like there’s a dumpster fire going on outside of us, if we still can understand what our own is going on inside of us so that we can choose our responses rather than being just in reflexive reactivity, that’s also this really core key part of being a centered leader. And that’s something that, again, is benefited and created by doing core centering practices on a regular basis. So core centering fits into every one of these boxes to change someone’s physiology, to help improve stress tolerance, help improve focus, help improve empathy, help improve the ability to be responsible, humility, expressiveness. You look at every one of these traits, and I can say, yes, yes, yes, yes, of exactly why core centering helps support every single one of those, which brings that idea of centeredness, being a centered leader to the forefront to engage all parts of the mind to become fully present.

Brian
It’s like a perfect match. We couldn’t have planned it any better ourselves, Ani.

Ani
If we had planned it- We have actually planned it ahead of time, we couldn’t plan it any better.

Brian
Yes.

Ani
As you’re talking, just imagining what the world would be like if every leader was a centered leader. At first my thoughts went to how much more joyful, how much less violent the world would be and all of those kinds of things. Then, Brian, my brain expanded and said, and then we’d actually be able to find resolution to some of these societal issues that we’ve been trying to find resolution to for many, many years, and we keep recreating the same problems. Then we could actually find a new way of being human with each other. And that would be the positive outpouring from a world where it’s not just that every leader has to be a centered leader. If 51 %, we have a tipping point. So Well, actually, in terms of tipping point, we just need to know that even one more leader who is a centered leader could be the tipping point. Just one more could be the tipping point. So if you are listening to this and you know somebody who’s a CEO, a manager, a director, a teacher, some leader, team leader, or organizational leader, or business owner, or entrepreneur, it’s such a great conversation so they can can think more powerfully about how to be a centered leader themselves and enjoy the positive results from that.

Brian
Yeah. And if you are a coach, an ICF coach, do work in consulting organizations and those sorts of things, and you’re like, yes, how do I understand, learn how to help my clients become centered leaders?

Ani
Start with Core Centering. Yeah, start with core centering and the somatic practice essentials, because that’s the place for… Even if you just start there and that’s all you do, you’re going to get so much value from it. We have our students who work in organizations come back time and time again and tell us. They just sprinkle it in. They don’t even do things a lot of times that are these big, drawn out. We have students who do big, drawn out programs as well, but they just sprinkle it in and what a difference it makes. What a difference it makes, yeah. Yeah. So thanks, Brian.

Brian
Such a great conversation. And we’re going to be live at Kripalu again, first week in June. That’s right.

Ani
We hope to see you there. Join us there. Bye-bye.

Get started today!

Start your Somatic Coach Training Journey by Unlocking Human Potential… Our students always say, “I wish I had started sooner!”

Click to Unlock Human Potential